How to deliver social impact with social media – a guide

Cover of Social by Social
Cover of Social by Social
Thought I’d bring your attention to a book and website that has just launched that could prove useful for you or or organisation if it’s thinking about social media.

Social by Social is ‘a practical guide to using new technologies to deliver social impact’. Supported by NESTA it has been put together by five highly experienced social entrepreneurs and reporters using social media in the UK. Their aim with the book (which you can order (£7.99), download for free as a PDF or read online) was to:

…help people in the public and third sectors do more good, by showing them the power of these technologies and how to access them. In the process, we hope we can also educate funders and policy workers about the huge shift of mindset and expectations needed to commission these projects successfully, to give the innovators more space to work.

Reading through, the advice and information given is as valid for corporate communications and businesses as it is for anyone in the third sector, individual or groups planning a campaign. Of particular note is the set of 38 initial propositions (or manifesto) for working in social media, which include advice such as:

1. Give up the illusion of control
2. People make technology matter

5. Go where people are

8. Learn to listen before you start talking

14. Start small

16. Keep it simple

Worth a read.

Also see: Writing a corporate Twitter strategy.

And whilst we’re thinking about the future…

Steve Bridger has put together an excellent presentation for the Third Sector Forum, challenging notions about how charities should operate in the future, within a more social and participatory media world.

The presentation is very much in tune with the work that Made By Many have been doing with Amnesty International (see this previous post), and it distills some very complex issues into something clearly understandable.

What’s more, much of what’s said is not just relevant to the third sector but to any other sector where transactions are the primary way of operating.

FWD>> Come to Brussels and demand sound copyright

A message from the folks at Open Rights Group regarding Sound Copyright:

The European Parliament is set to vote on whether to double the term of copyright in sound recordings. Sound Copyright invites you to register your concern at an event on the proposed Term Extension Directive, on Tuesday 27 January 2009 in the European Parliament in Brussels.

This flawed Directive has been unanimously condemned by Europe’s leading intellectual property research centres. The European Parliament must address the mounting concerns of consumer groups and copyright users if they want a modern, workable intellectual property policy. Please, if you can, come to Brussels and register your concern. If you can’t make it, please invite your MEP to attend on your behalf.

Looking forward to seeing you in Brussels,

Becky Hogge
Executive Director, Open Rights Group

And if you can’t go?
ORG suggests:

For more on how copyright term extension in sound recordings works view this video.

Anita Roddick still lives online

Anitaroddick.com

Many would be surprised to learn that Anita Roddick still has a living online presence and brand, under the auspises of www.anitaroddick.com. Even more would be surprised to find that the website proclaims the strapline “I’m an activist” and lists a “my books” section, selling eleven mostly autobiographical works. Seemingly, for all intents and purposes, that the former founder and owner of the Body Shop were still alive.

Continue reading → Anita Roddick still lives online