Big_Ben_under_construction_in_1983

Bringing digital and data disruption to government

In late 2016 I was invited with my Represent.me democracy hat on to speak at TransPolitica, in the session “Bringing digital and data disruption to government”. It’s a conference aiming at real world policy changes for a radically better future.

Together with Tim from the CivicTech coworking hub RainGods (home to Represent’s London office) and Dan from MegaNexus we discussed how social enterprises are revolutionising democracy and the political process: from better information, to more abundant voting, and crowd intelligence to the very purpose of Government.

Tim does a great intro to the civtech and government tech landscape at the start, and my bit kicks in about 14 minutes in.

Image credit: Big Ben by Glenluwin (Own work) CC BY-SA 3.0, via Wikimedia Commons.

The State of Democracy

Freedom Works
Demorcacy: Where its at and where we’re headed

Democracy is at a turning point. Since the financial crisis of 2008, the tools for participating in decision making have become more widely spread but at the same time power and money has been concentrated further in the hands of the few.

Narratives of fear, security and austerity put individuals and nations against one another. Many feel indifferent and, or, ignored. Governments – local, regional, national and supra-national – have less resources, requiring difficult decisions, often within a short-term context.

Yet there are communities, governments, campaigners, technologists, thinkers, political parties and others working on how things could be different.

The State of Democracy as an extension of some research with the Democratic Society and Jon Worth. It aims to explore what is happening, point to interesting discussions and to see what answers might be found.

Open Government, Open Business, Open dialogue: a UK view of social media and government

This is a copy of a piece I’ve written for the December 2011 issue of Service Contractor [PDF page 14], the magazine of Professional Services Council in the United States. All links are at the end of the article.
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On May 16, 2011, Jeremy Hunt, U.K. secretary of state for Culture, Olympics, Media and Sport, asked
citizens and those who work in fixed or mobile communications, television, radio, online publishing, video games, and other digital and creative content industries for responses to an open letter reviewing communications in the digital age. The open letter contained a series of questions aimed at gathering business and citizen ideas “to help frame the Government’s initial approach to deregulation and maximize the communications industry’s contribution to economic growth.”
Continue reading → Open Government, Open Business, Open dialogue: a UK view of social media and government